\
Scarlet-Letter

The Scarlet Letter By Nathaniel Hawthorne



  Categorie: Children, Fiction, Historical Fiction, History, Literature
  Author: Nathaniel Hawthorne

A beautiful woman who is punished for the mortal sin of loving a man other than her husband, a cowardly lover, a vengeful husband, a rebellious illegitimate child and the oppressive and patriarchal morality of 17th century Puritanism in Boston. Together these form an unforgettable and thought-provoking glimpse of how much social attitudes have changed over the centuries.

Nathaniel Hawthorne was the creator of such beloved works as Twice-Told Tales, A Wonder Book for Boys and Girls, The House of the Seven Gables and spine-chilling tales like Roger Malvin’s Burial. Scion of an old Puritan family from Salem, Massachusetts, Hawthorne was familiar with the old traditions of the area. He began writing in college and worked as a customs surveyor to earn his livelihood while pursuing his passion for creative writing. His friendship with Ralph Waldo Emerson broadened his horizons considerably and he experimented with movements like Transcendentalism.

The Scarlet Letter is a deeply disturbing novel about gender discrimination, women’s oppression, male dominated society and authoritarian religions. Set in 17th century Boston, its lovely heroine Hester Prynne, is accused of adultery and giving birth to an illegitimate child in the absence of her husband.

Download Links

eBook DOWNLOAD LINKS (from the public domain courtesy of gutenberg.org)
Download Epub - Ibooks for Iphone, Ipads, Nook & Sony Reader
Download Kindle - Mobi File Format for Kindle
Read eBook Online - Load eBook in Browser
Download Text Ebook - Not Available eBooks for Computers, Mac and Windows
Download PDF ebook - Not Available Download & View PDF file


AUDIOBOOK DOWNLOADS (from the public domain courtesy of archive.org)
MP3 Download Size: 252 MB Download each Chapter in One Zip File
iTunes Podcast - Complete download in iTunes podcasts
iPod/iPhone Audiobook - Audiobook in M4b Format

RELATED LINKS TO THIS BOOK - wikipedia, wikipedia

Comments are closed.